Zymo Clear MD

Active Ingredients:
Maltodextrin
(A polysaccharide used in food and cosmetics industry. )
Lipase
(An enzyme which hydrolyses fats. )
Subtilisin
(A protease - an enzyme that hydrolyses peptides into smaller parts or amino-acids. )

Zymo Clear MD contains two enzymes, which remove oil and dead skin cells from the skin. The third component - maltodextrin, has considerable moisturizing properties and acts as a carrier ingredient. Thanks to the well-assessed process of controlled release, maltodextrin dramatically enhances the activity of the linked functional substance, reducing in the meantime the irritative effects possibly associated with the free form of active ingredients. In particular, the enzymes complexed with maltodextrin do not lose their activity once included in the finished cosmetic, making it possible to take the maximum advantage of their properties.

Innovative and effective enzyme complex made of lipases (lipid-degrading enzymes) and proteases (enzymes with a keratolytic effect), which support efficient exfoliation, positively affect the oil balance of dry and oily skin and provide the skin with a fine-pored look and a smooth glow.

The enzymes lipase and protease are characterized by very wide substrate specificity and good stability to pH and temperature so that they can catalyze the cleavage of most of the ester links in fats and peptide links in proteins, reducing them to small molecules easily soluble. Thanks to their biochemical activity, lipase and protease can be applied to the skin to carry out a keratolytic and lipolytic action, helping in gentle cleansing.

At low concentrations, lipase and protease are useful in ingredients designed for a deep skin cleaning and, in particular, for cleansing of seborrheic skins, where the overproduction of oil in the sebaceous gland and subsequent clogging of the pores and inflammation is usually aggravated by increased keratin production by the horny layer.

The inclusion of Zymo Clear MD in skin cleansers and makeup removers facilitates the cleansing process and allows the reduction of other more harsh ingredients. Promoting the enzymatic peeling (degradation of sebum and keratin), it makes possible the easy removal of the breakdown compounds derived from the above substances and thus of excess fat, sweat, and dirt, makeup residues, and naturally loosened keratinized cells from the epidermis, helping to preserve the protective mantle of the skin from the aggressive action of common detergents. Its use is valid for any skin cleansing formulation and is particularly recommended in products designed for cleansing seborrheic or sensitive skin.

See also: 

Products containing Zymo Clear MD

F.A.Q.: 

What are lipases?

Lipases are enzymes belonging to the class of hydrolases that insert the components of a water molecule, H and OH, at the level of a specific substrate bond, determining the cleavage of the bond itself. Sometimes this is a reversible reaction, but usually, it is not. The class of hydrolases is an extensive enzyme class including important subclasses, among which is the subclass of esterases, enzymes hydrolyzing the ester link between one acid and an alcohol. Thus, lipases hydrolyze triglycerides, components of fats, into free fatty acids and glycerol.

What are proteases?

Proteases represent a subclass of hydrolases in that they cleave the peptide links of proteins. By no means all peptide links are hydrolyzed by all peptidases; whether a given enzyme will act or not depends on the nature of the other chemical groups in the neighborhood of the peptide link. For example, some enzymes do not require an adjacent terminal carboxyl or amino group and may even be prevented from acting by such groups. In contrast, others require such a free terminal group.

The former, called endopeptidases, can thus act in the middle of a peptide chain, breaking protein molecules up into smaller fragments, but will generally hydrolyze small peptides only if the terminal groups are artificially blocked by chemical means. The latter, called exopeptidases, cannot hydrolyze links in the middle of the chain, but act, some from carboxyl and others from the amino end of the chain, removing the terminal amino acids successively at a time.