Lauryl Glucoside

Lauryl Glucoside

Lauryl glucoside is an alkyl polyglucoside (C 12-16 fatty alcohol glucoside), a mild surfactant and skin cleanser with excellent foaming properties derived from natural corn starch, fatty acids, and coconut. In addition, it is non-petrochemical, non-ethoxylated, and readily biodegradable.

Lauryl glucoside exhibits superior cleansing efficacy as a minimum outcome. It meets cleansing targets in the same way as standard surfactants while also providing the additional benefit of exceptional mildness in personal care formulations. A deep pore cleansing test shows that cleaning with water does not remove the soil sufficiently from the skin. In contrast, the cleansing with both Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Lauryl glucoside shows excellent cleansing efficacy. The best-combined results in cleansing and mildness are achieved with this "green" ingredient.
 

F.A.Q.: 

What are the benefits of Lauryl glucoside?

Lauryl Glucoside is a one-of-a-kind surfactant that brings superior benefits to skincare products:

  • Preferred for extra mild body and hair cleansing
  • Special foam in comparison to other nonionic cleaning agents
  • Best choice for baby concepts
  • Extreme mildness to skin
  • Deep pore cleansing
  • Free from preservatives, sulfates, and ethylene oxide
  • The high degree of safety for consumers and the environment

Uncompromising mildness

Lauryl glucoside is not only gentle on the skin but can reduce the irritation potential of surfactant mixtures. Compared to other surfactants,  it is much milder and can be used in effective formulas with outstanding ocular and mucous compatibility without trading performance. During 3D human cornea equivalent model tests, no damage was observed, further confirming the mildness of LG.

Excellent daily cleaning

Lauryl glucoside shows a lower irritation potential than the other surfactants tested, confirming its excellent suitability for ensuring mildness in body washes. As a measure of skin barrier integrity, the cumulative irritation potential of surfactants is assessed by transepidermal water loss (TEWL).

Shampoos with Lauryl glucoside

If chemicals have already damaged the hair, it can be further weakened by treatments with surfactants. In other words, sensitive hair such as bleached, colored, permed, weathered, or magnificent hair should be shampooed with gentle-action surfactants.

According to a study into the effects of alkyl glucoside on the phenomenon of scale lifting during extension of untreated hair fibers, it was found that treatments with Sodium Laureth Sulfate lead to the more extensive weakening of the scale structure of combed fibers. At pronounced extension levels, cuticle cells start to separate from underlying cuticles. By contrast, treatments with Lauryl glucoside show less severe scale lifting and reduced angles of scale lifting.

In comparison Sodium Laureth Sulfate, instead, has a strong effect on the hair surface, appearing as the lifting of the cuticle scales. In terms of cleansing efficacy, the lipometric measurements show the comparable effects of Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Lauryl glucoside.

Gentle cleansing with the power of nature

The use of Lauryl glucoside in shampoo allows consumers to take advantage of the efficacy of nature in removing chemical residues from the hair. The analysis of silicone remaining on hair shows that, with one-time washing using a stripping shampoo containing LG, silicone can be reduced by 62% on virgin hair and 77% on bleached hair. After three washes, the deposit reduction on virgin hair is even more significant. Compared to Sodium Laureth Sulfate shampoos, this represents a marked improvement. After using a Lauryl glucoside shampoo, the hair is better prepared for deep penetrating treatments.

Excellent foam height

It improves the foam properties of shampoos, produces good, quantitatively stable foam, and sustains its height.

Sensory profile for the hair

In a sensory test comparison of Cocamidopropyl Betaine and Lauryl glucoside as the primary surfactant of shampoo, the results showed no difference in terms of stickiness either in wet hair or during hair drying. Together with the better-wet combability, better foam properties, and the proven kindness to the skin exhibited by LG, this finding confirms the superiority of alkyl polyglucosides in shampoo applications.